180 Experience

Bass Drum Speed Builder

Di-Ga, Di-Ga, Digada, Digada… Say It, Play It is going to serve you well on this one! Start by either counting the subdivisions as numbers or as random sounds that help you distinguish what’s happening. Either way, go slow and make sure your hands aren’t speeding up or slowing down. Always use a click. ALWAYS!

#180Challenge

Instructor: Luke Holland

Concepts: sextuplet sextuplets power powerful double kick pedal double pedals bass drum fast increase speed control independence faster improve fun metal exercise exercises foundation develop Hardcore post

This Practice is worth 125 points

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  • JustinSalter 2 years ago

    Nice! I’d love to learn more his fills, thanks guys!

    • Jake Nicolle 2 years ago

      Awesome Justin! Did you check out all his lessons yet?

  • José Chapa 4 years ago

    I have two questions. What kind of tension does he use on his drum pedals? And does the brand or kind of drum pedals matters when you are playing? Oh last question. How exactly does seat height affect when you play double pedal?

    • Jake Nicolle 4 years ago

      That’s a great question! His tension is “Stock” meaning he didn’t adjust the tension from the time he purchased the pedal. Somewhere in the middle would be your best bet :) Brand really doesn’t matter as long as the pedal is sturdy and comfortable. Pedals are such a personal thing, it’s really up to you to try and feel what works by going to a store and trying a bunch. The height of your seat, relative to your height matters. I like to sit with my thighs just above 90 degrees to my shins. Or parallel to the floor and then raise your seat a little more :)

    • José Chapa 4 years ago

      Thanks a lot Jake I will check the tension of my pedals. I have the Pearl Eliminators with belt drive I don’t know what’s the difference between belt drive and chain drive. That’s other question that I have.

    • Jake Nicolle 4 years ago

      Belt drive simply creates a different attack and feel for the pedal. I like to keep my pedals a medium spring tension. Not too tight or too loose, right out of the box. This way, when I’m sitting in on a gig or come across another pedal, most of the time it’s similar in tension to what I’m use to.